Bin Laden’s Invisible Children

Narrative is a crucial element for any war, whether on Bin Laden in Afghanistan or on Joseph Kony in Uganda. Generally this narrative, to settle public debate and drive broad sentiment towards a single goal, is one-sided and oversimplified. An opposing narrative is difficult to craft because it must either be complex, therefore hard to … Continue reading

Senator Gillibrand is a Dangerous Pirate

Stifling the economy, trampling private property and straight thievery are the Senator’s current activities, at least according to the legislation she’s trying to pass. The PROTECT IP legislation being discussed in the Senate that she’s a co-sponsor of in theory seeks to prevent online piracy, but does little to stop intellectual property theft and in … Continue reading

This Can Get Mark Zuckerberg Arrested

Mark Zuckerberg faces 15 brutal years in a Thai prison. According to the Computer Crimes Act of Thailand, a website owner is responsible for anything written on their site, not just the actual author of the content. So if anyone posts anything on Facebook that is considered illegal in Thailand, Zuckerberg could be held responsible. … Continue reading

Iraq: A Digital Dissenter

In today’s podcast, Mark talks with young Iraqi digital media activist Hayder Hamzoz. They discuss current conditions of repression in Iraq for new media political activism. Hamzoz runs the blog Iraqi Streets 4 Change, which documents peaceful public dissent in order to push the Iraqi government to expedite democratic reforms. He also works on Salam … Continue reading

Killing Code Can Kill People

How do you effectively document human rights atrocities and not get caught? This is an extremely difficult problem, one that takes experience, ingenuity, and, often unfortunately, trial and error. The consequences can be devastating, but new technologies expand the options for creative people who are trying to make a difference in their societies to be … Continue reading

New tactics in Authoritarianism

Dictators are often ruthless, charismatic and extremely intelligent. They also have the resources to Be extremely sophisticated. If not showy. In modern times, it’s hard for dictators to operate in the ways that they used to. Their citizens having mobile phone cameras and an audience of the world, its just not as easy to have … Continue reading

Notes on Wikileaks

I recently met Julian Assange. My conversation with him helped to shine a light on for Wikileaks’ internal processes, just as Raffi Khatchadourian’s brilliant piece in the New Yorker and Julian’s TED talk also helped to do. Julian’s point, which I agree with, is often that newspapers are failing because of bad journalism. How many … Continue reading

Presenting at ITP Social Activism using Mobile Technology class

Back in May I had the pleasure of exploring The Future, also known as NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program Spring Show 2009. Last night I had the pleasure of actually molding it by guest lecturing Nathan Freitas’ Social Activism using Mobile Technology class at ITP with my colleague Emily Jacobi. The topic of our class was … Continue reading

Mobiles Hidden in Monks’ Robes

My colleague Emily wrote  an article about our experiences during the Saffron Uprising and the creation of Digital Democracy. It was published by MobileActive: On Sept. 26, the protests were still going strong. It was 11 am, and Aung Aung Ye was juggling two computers and a mobile phone from his office in Thailand. That … Continue reading

Open Video Conference – Day 2

Day 2 started yet again without any coffee, but with a hilarious presentation by Jonathan Zittrain of the Berkman Center pretending to be Clay Shirky of ITP. Clay was delayed on a flight, so Jonathan took over with a talk titled “Here Comes Everybody.” He did a great job of pumping energy into the conference … Continue reading